Volume 3: Interrupted Flow

Chapter 16: Urban Street Facilities

Chapter 16, Urban Street Facilities, describes an integrated multimodal methodology for evaluating the quality of service provided to road users traveling along an urban street. An urban street is unique among road types because it typically serves multiple travel modes. Four of the more common urban street travel modes include automobile, pedestrian, bicycle, and transit. Travelers associated with each of these modes use different criteria to evaluate the service provided to them when they travel along an urban street. This integrated multimodal approach allows analysts to analyze urban streets from a “complete streets” perspective.

Chapter 17: Urban Street Segments

Chapter 17, Urban Street Segments, describes a methodology for evaluating the capacity and quality of service provided to road users traveling along an urban street segment. However, the methodology is much more than just a tool for evaluating capacity and quality of service. The methodology includes an array of performance measures that more fully describes segment operation for multiple travel modes. These measures serve as clues in identifying the source of problems and provide insight into the development of effective improvement strategies. The analyst is encouraged to consider the full range of measures when using this methodology.

Chapter 18: Signalized Intersections

Chapter 18, Signalized Intersections, describes a methodology for evaluating the capacity and quality of service provided to road users traveling through a signalized intersection. However, the methodology is much more than just a tool for evaluating capacity and quality of service. It includes an array of performance measures that describe intersection operation for multiple travel modes. These measures serve as clues for identifying the source of problems and provide insight into the development of effective improvement strategies. The analyst using this methodology is encouraged to consider the full range of measures.

Chapter 19: Two-Way Stop-Controlled Intersections

Chapter 19, Two-Way STOP-Controlled Intersections, presents concepts and procedures for analyzing these types of intersections. Chapter 9 provides a glossary and list of symbols, including those used for TWSC intersections.

Chapter 20: All-Way Stop-Controlled Intersections

Chapter 20, All-Way STOP-Controlled Intersections, presents concepts and procedures for analyzing these types of intersections (1). A glossary and list of symbols, including those used for all-way STOP-controlled (AWSC) intersections, is provided in Chapter 9.

Chapter 21: Roundabouts

Chapter 21, Roundabouts, presents concepts and procedures for analyzing these intersections. National Cooperative Highway Research Program Project 3- 65 (1) provided a comprehensive database of roundabout operations for U.S. conditions on the basis of a study of 31 sites. The procedures that follow are largely founded on that study’s recommendations. These procedures allow the analyst to assess the operational performance of an existing or planned one-lane or two-lane roundabout given traffic demand levels.

Chapter 22: Interchange Ramp Terminals

Chapter 22, Interchange Ramp Terminals, presents the methodology for the analysis of interchanges involving freeways and surface streets (i.e., service interchanges), and it was developed primarily on the basis of research conducted through the National Cooperative Highway Research Program (1–3) and elsewhere.

Chapter 23: Off-Street Pedestrian and Bicycle Facilities

Chapter 23, Off-Street Pedestrian and Bicycle Facilities, provides capacity and level-of-service (LOS) estimation procedures.

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